About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
,000. this is -- we check credit. we need a business plan. then we look at the three-year tax return and that statement. we do a lot of home care and mom-and-pop shops. we also do start ups. we asked for approval through documents. we work a lot with people who do not know how to file taxes properly. we are mainly focused in san francisco. we are small. we focus mainly on the tenderloin, chinatown, bayview, visitation. we do a lot of expansion. people start small through the credit union and then want to go to the bank. we know we are limited. we cannot afford to give out a big loan. starting from the credit union, we educate them about filing taxes properly and then moving on to the bank, a small one, expansion, and we work with the bank. the bank and credit union are similar. we do allow tax returns, projections. credit unions do not charge an additional loan or processing fee. processing time, on a small loan, -- consumer loans probably a few days. because we require a business plan, sometimes it takes longer. business plans take a while. especially bank statements. we need to see
your business, with tax -- green your business, tax credits available with that. for non-profit, charitable organizations, we have a workshop coming up. that is helpful for those of you who are looking to access the committee on a durable basis. >> also, on behalf of leader pelosi, i want to thank our panel and her staff. we are tenants in this building. i apologize for the security situation that happened upstairs. if you have concerns about it, please come and see me. i would like to convey those to the landlord here so that it does not happen again. thank you. >> hi, everybody. my name is carmen chu. why don't we get started. with a marking up with the department of small business -- we have been working with the department of small business. this project started when we heard from neighborhood merchants. unfortunately, they had access issues, visibility access issues. we have been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank
thoughts about expanding the tax breaks, giving business to other areas in your district? >> i talked a little bit earlier about raising taxes and raising revenues and fees, and for me, the tax exemption is something i do not philosophically supports. yet, i often represent part of san francisco that has been neglected for decades, and that is the midmarket corridor. we have over 3 million square feet of commercial real estate. a lot of it has been vacant for decades. the building twitter is going to be using, it has been vacant since 1968. we have to start looking at what tools do we have to revitalize the area, and what i like about this legislation is we are not just giving a tax break to come in. you have to create jobs. you pay your payroll tax base, but if you move to midmarket and create jobs, we will not tax you on those jobs for six years. for the next six years, you are a community partner with us, partnering with us to revitalize neighborhood and then, if you are successful in six years, hopefully and the midmarket become successful, you come back into the tax system. i do
government, ok. this is tax incentives. you have to have tax liability. you have to pay taxes to make this thing valuable to you, but most people do. the law is written at 30% of the cost you can have a tax credit of 30%. let's talk about real numbers. what am i paying now and what am i going to be paying in the future? if i can make money today on my monthly payment and go green, why not? solar kind of reverses the effect. it's like tax brackets. the return on investment typically is higher if you got a big bill. there is also another thing about time of use rates. i want to go over it very briefly. it does have some effect and you will hear it about on your bid. the time of use rate is a way that you tilts are trying to help -- utilities are trying to manage their peak demand. you charge people more during peak periods. you make it up to them by charging the low market rate off peak. this is off peak and you'll be charged a very low rate for it. at shoulder peak you'll be charged more. at on peak, you'll be charged the most, another shoulder, another off peak. so what happens is tha
in the last congress when later closing was speaker of the house. she had had 16 tax cuts signed into law to help small businesses grow and thrive. as we know, during the last 15 years, small businesses account for about 2/3 of the job growth in our country, but when the bush recession hits in 2009, 2010, small businesses were hit particularly hard. small businesses are the center of her agenda. congress under her leadership gave 27 million small businesses tax cuts. two main pieces of legislation -- the small businesses jobs act in the information you have, will create a total of 500,000 jobs and create eight tax cuts. they are all described in the packet you have. also, unleashing up to $300 billion in credit for small businesses to access. there are another eight tax cuts that were passed through a number of different laws. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart
to you the team that brought the treasured tax collector's office to the 21st century. the municipal tax automation team, darrell ascano, tajel shah, and rebecca villareal- mayer, come on up. [applause] >> i've been anointed to speak for us. jose has asked me to use my outside voice. we are so lucky. very rarely in your life to you get a blank canvas with leadership to tell you to find problems and solve them. i want to thank our leadership for doing that and giving us not only the opportunity to make change, but also to really make mistakes. i think that's a rare thing, to be able to make mistakes in this environment and continue to proceed and be successful. i mean it when we say -- what we end up doing is so different. we work to scale every day. we invite the people that we serve every day. thank you to the nominees. to our leadership, thank you. thank you to all the winners and to all the people we get to work with and serve. thanks. [applause] >> let's hear it for the tax team. [applause] >> parking is a universal quality of life issue. it touches on so many different parts of the
-site, are you able to take advantage of tax credits or some other sorces of funding? >> no, it wouldn't align with a kind of 60% ami tax credit and, in fact, the program prevents you from meeting your inclusionary obligation through the taking advantage of other subsidies. so we wouldn't see that alignment. >> so they are generally done not with other subsidies? >> that is my understanding. the 70% threshold is in the code. these are great questions and policy questions to come back and address, but our procedures manual update doesn't contemplate a change to that. >> i wasn't familiar with the offsite ami was encouraged. there is some reason if the ami is lower off-site, that is some rationale to have them offsite? >> i can come back and report on that. i think it's a very fair question. certainly on the face of it it means to get deeper affordable, . >> i'm sorry, deputy city attorney susan cleveland knowles, just to correct one thing mr. adams just said, the current code does not provides that if you are doing a tax-exempt project you are not subject to the inclusionary housing progr
-- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a letter and say there were compile -- compliance issues. where people get in trouble is they ignore the letter. we need to make sure it that your pro-active and responsive. when a business receives a letter, they need to contact our office. the merchants of been very proactive -- have been very pro- active. the businesses that have received a letter and passed an inspectio
right to view not necessarily, but what about right to value? we pay taxes and we pay taxes on property and property is high because you have a view. well, with this thing we will no longer have any views. and the question also is addition to solar panels under the draft motion it says, "the project is desirable as in keeping with the neighborhood character of tall multi-unit buildings." what about the neighborhood character that isn't next door to the building? what about the neighborhood character of people like us on jackson street on which there are multiple buildings that face this view? we're all affected by this one owner, one singular addition for one families. we're not talking about adding more space for families, but a penthouse for some owner who will block the view and dress decrease the value for all of us in the neighborhood. this is part of the character of the city. you can't encroach by building more and more higher and higher buildings. there was supposed to be a pre-application meeting. nothing. i went away for thanksgiving. i came back there was no notice. a neigh
. they cannot collect any tax revenue. they do not have any taxing authority. the port lives and dies by the revenue it generates on the port property. >> how is the ferry building doing in terms of creating revenue? >> it has been phenomenally successful. we are fully leased. the active merchants are incredibly happy to be part of the vibrant community. >> this is one of the most see places in san francisco. anybody who comes here from out of town, you have to walk through the ferry building. >> there are a lot of visitors here. definitely a lot of locals, too, who feel strongly about the connection to the marketplace. >> you were mentioning that this is pierre -- pier 14. >> first, it was a brick water for the downtown ferry terminal, constructed in 2001. after that, we added public access on top of it and connected it to the land side. now is eight 637-foot-long public access pier to enjoy the day, watched the very activity. there is a little bit of art on top of it. there are swivel chairs on a it and there are little sea >> can you t about proposition a that may affect this water
-cent sales tax dedicated to water and sewer infrastructure. hunter: that sales tax counts for about a third of the revenue of the department right now. franklin: we got 75% of the voters to agree to tax themselves so that their children and their children's children could have clean water because we're investing in it now. hunter: there were no alternatives. the infrastructure was in dire straits. a lot of people didn't want to believe it had to be done, but it had to be done. what came out of those lawsuits by the upper chattahoochee river keeper were two consent decrees, focused on overflows. the intent is, city of atlanta, you need to keep the flows in the pipe. narrator: with the help of the funding the city raised, atlanta has been implementing an asset management plan that evaluates and addresses their infrastructure issues. hunter: it's a continuum. at one end, you have your regular maintenance that you do every day on the system, and at the other end, long-term planning so that every year we're repairing, replacing the right things, and we don't have to do it all at once, which is,
these specimens saved. i go to a tax dermist shop when the man gives a look of hear when i pull out the ear shells. he refused to do it. i return it later and unmake his look say, i will never do it again your ear shells forgotten in the trash bin of the polytechnic where i toss them of history. days later i'm convinced i see one hand carried by a rat. seeking the traces of your body and the animals is this not a form of transcendence my darling. a downward rising the maggets small white gods like an animal mob. you did not answer my question with the language we used between us you vomited and stared into the lenses i wore to cover my pupils to keep some things in and some things out plastic screens. was it not possible to make love in that space. i could save you and i do make an essay and listened and obeyed. i hoped to carry your ear shell with me. i read the manual from beginning to end a manual for the master's and the slaves much the master hates the slave. not the [inaudible] we would like your spirit. it is what we seek in the dark pits of the capital. what else could be accomplished or d
was with tax dollars. you already paid for it, we're trying to give it back to you. and, so, we take a wholesale retail. we want to be the providers of the data as a fuel, but fuel, gasoline is useless to get you from point a to point b unless you consume that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support a
with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mea
that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video. i want to share with you a few things that users are saying at telling us about their experience. 91% says that it helps them share information. that is the number one thing that people providing support to us want. 80% says that it strengthens connections. how can using something on-line actually make us feel closer or more connected to our friends and family? out it works, the more connected th
and it was the wrong target. you spend $3 trillion on the budget and tax cut for the wealthiest americans and took their money to the camen islands and not in america and having huge threats and medicaid and medicare and threaten the scpeerns that is violence. number one and must commit ourselves to the ban on assault weapons. we lost about 6,000 americans in iraq in 10 years. lose 30 to 50,000 a home at home. 100,000 are injured and didn't die and the highest cost in any city is the emergency room hospitals in those cities where they're shot. [inaudible] shot by ak47's. we have a lot of role in the killing of syria. 9/11 /12 in benghazi. [inaudible] yards away. we must revive the ban on these adult suspects. i don't want to. >> >> >> deemphasize the drug culture and americans and so we have this crisis mr. mayor of plants closing when the cheap labor markets, jobs leaving, drugs and guns coming. that requires a national effort by all of us. while i reach out to you in san francisco those that hear my voice please stop the killing. please stop drug flow. please give peace a chance. in thi
$55 million in tax revenue. nightlife is the only significant industry in this city that sometimes gets treated at times as it is a nuisance, a problem to be managed. and of course, we have to focus on making sure it is safe and that people are complying with the laws and that we are not having shooting. but when you get so focused on combating the negatives -- every industry has the negatives. you can sometimes lose sight of the positives and we know there are a huge positives for nightlife in the city. we know that a lot of our street shares are at risk -- street fairs are at risk of being given fees to death. we have completely outdated the planning commission like that mission how are used district, which makes it extremely hard to do anything alcohol related in a big swath of the mission. there was a bowling alley that wanted to go in at 17th and van ness and they were not going to be able to do it because they would have been banned from even selling beer. that is the tip of the iceberg in terms of planning provisions that make it hard to foster a knife in the city. we are no
issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different revenue streams for our parks, are trying to find new ways to fund public transportation in the city. we're very happy to be working with mayor lee and the board to address a lot of these issues. this will clearly be a busy year for us. another component of our work is connecting the city's robuspro o assistance with our many business partners. this is a core part of mfac original purpose in san francisco. we are focused on building this capacity once again. as everyone here knows, the nature of how cities are doing business is changing. fundamentally. costly federal and state mandates continue to squeeze local budgets. increasing costs are forcing discussions about how we provide services. technology is requiring that we move more quickly than we have in a long time. building a network of partners to support our city government at this time will be more important than ever and will be critical as we were to e
in a city that is over-taxing the and running down. [applause] >> i do think that you can do a lot through talking to your city supervisor and working through that process. i am telling you, there are ways that began help you. alcohol is a local issue on this type of matter. what we are behind would you guys want to do, whenever that is. a lot of times we do not always have statutes that make that much sense. it is partly the ways that the laws have evolved and we are the ones who are stuck with enforcing them the way that they are. that does not necessarily mean that we think they are particularly good ideas, but we certainly want people to grow, prosper, and be saved. that can be achieved in all sorts of ways. we want to work with you on that. thank you. >> i was the founding president of the entertainment commission. i retired and went on to found the culture association, the first trade association statewide for night life, bar, and restaurant activities. i am here with a question that plagues a lot of these license holders, who desire to have their establishment opened for all age dan
, including whether to raise taxes and fees or whether to make cuts. how will your approach these choices? supervisor kim: the budget is tough this year. even though our deficit is not as large as it has been, it is tough because we have made these cuts already, and did this point, we are cutting things we really do not want to cut. and it is painful. we will lose more potential services. we will also not be able to support our residents. we are looking at weekend meals for seniors. it is painful. i think we have to look at it as a combined approach. it has to be cut within city government that we can bear -- services that are less essential. second, you have to look at raising revenue in the city. i think it needs to be a combination. and third, need to be much better informed, and we have to ask our public employees to look at the budget. and they already have, but also to look back. it is a threefold approach to me. >> what are the city's housing needs him much of the board of supervisors to to address them? supervisor kim: it is tough, because we depend on the market to build housing
. a larger cost on a smaller tax base, and, arguably, less affluent communities. man: sewickley township is a rural farming community, however, herminie itself would be considered to be the downtown area of the township. it's the agways, the auto-parts store, the bank. it's your typical small-town village. man: people think that rural areas are pristine and perfect and everybody has a nice, simple life. that's, uh, not exactly the situation here. when you come into town in the summer, you know you're coming to herminie. woman: the aroma in 90-degree days... can sometimes just want to knock you over. woman: we have water. we have power, we have gas, but we have no sewage. i guess when they laid out the town years ago, it just all went into the pipes and straight into the "crick." sabljak: i've lived here 43 years in the same house. when i moved here, they told us that sewage would be here shortly. and here it is 43 years later and we still don't have it. my husband and i went to the first meeting. he always said, "boy, i'll never see it in my lifetime." well... my husband passed away last
in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> thank you kindly. as an ex-felon, it's not my first effort with a public defender in public for a bunch of people who i know are working hard to make this substance abuse incarceration cognitive behavior thing work all together. i started doing my career in rehabs and jails and shelters and where i live. it's a privilege to work for people who chose to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)